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Bahá’ís Using Drugs

 

One of my readers wrote:

I have a friend who is smoking weed and truthfully, I do not know exactly what to do! I wish in my heart and soul that he would stop because it is hurting him. He is part of the Baha’i community and I am trying to get him involved in Baha’i activities. At the same time I want to talk to him person to person with all of my love for him, so that he can find a permanent solution to his difficulties.  I was wondering if you could help out.

I replied:

A very dear friend of mine, who’d pioneered and served the Faith devotedly for many years, very deepened, burned out, resigned, got into a gay lifestyle, developed AIDS and starting using crystal meth.  Like you, it hurt my heart!  I didn’t know what to do!  To make matters worse, I was troubled by this quote, which seemed to suggest that something very active had to be done on my part or I would be called to account for falling short in my duty to my Lord!

O ye lovers of God! In this, the cycle of Almighty God, violence and force, constraint and oppression, are one and all condemned. It is, however, mandatory that the use of opium be prevented by any means whatsoever, that perchance the human race may be delivered from this most powerful of plagues. And otherwise, woe and misery to whoso falleth short of his duty to his Lord.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 149)

I wrote to the House of Justice and this was their reply:

In general, a person who has withdrawn from the Faith is regarded as being among the generality of humankind with whom the Bahá’ís are enjoined to associate “in joy and fragrance”. In contemplating how to associate with your friend at this time, you are encouraged to draw inspiration and guidance from the peerless example of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, whose compassion, loving understanding and sincere concern for the welfare of others exemplified the Bahá’í attitude to those who are suffering.

Be assured of the ardent prayers of the House of Justice in the Holy Shrines that Bahá’u’lláh may surround your friend with His loving protection and tender mercies and bountifully bless your noble efforts in the path of His service.

So from that, I took that my responsibility was to:

  • Associate with him “in joy and fragrance”
  • Have compassion
  • Show loving understanding
  • Demonstrate sincere concern for his welfare

I love that you want to bring him into Bahá’í activities, but his shame might prevent him from doing it.  I’m sure he knows what the standards are, and although I don’t know his source of pain, you can count on the fact that he has a painful story to tell!  If you’re able to do all the things the House suggests, he might open up and tell it to you, which in turn, will make it easier for you to have compassion and loving understanding!

As Bahá’ís we’re told that the role of the individual is to be loving and forgiving; to have a “sin covering eye”; to “breathe not the sins of others” and to “plow our own fields”.  The role of the institutions is justice.   We tend to mix this up as Shoghi Effendi tells us:

There is a tendency to mix up the function of the Administration and try to apply it in individual relationships, which is abortive, because the Assembly is a nascent House of Justice and is supported to administer according to the Teachings, the affairs of the community. But individuals toward each other are governed by love, unity, forgiveness and sin-covering eye. Once the friends grasp this they will get along much better, but they keep playing Spiritual Assembly to each other and expect the Assembly to behave like an individual.  (Shoghi Effendi  Lights of Guidance, p. 77)

So from this quote I understand that our role is to have:

  • love
  • unity
  • forgiveness
  • sin-covering eye

Also, we know that we are all sinners:

We are all sinners  (Abdu’l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 176)

So to single out his “sin” doesn’t even make sense when we all have sins!  For example, some sins are worse than others – lying and backbiting for example (the most grievous and the most odious), and chances are good you’re guilty of both of those!

So my suggestion is that if it really troubles you and you really believe he’s harming the Faith, then give the information to the LSA and let them deal with it; and if not, be loving, forgiving towards him and focus on your own development.

Hope this has been helpful but if you have further questions, I’m happy to engage!

What are your thoughts on Bahá’ís using drugs?  Post your comments below:

Physical Treatments for Disease

 

This is part eight of an eleven part series on the Baha’i Perspective on Disease.   In Part 1,  we looked at how I got interested in this topic and looked at some quotes on prevention of disease.  In Part 2, we looked at the reasons for disease.  In Part 3, we looked at the physical cause of disease, in Part 4 we looked at the spiritual causes, in Part 5 we looked at the effects of disease, in Part 6 we looked at the attitudes we want to strive for, when we are diseased, in Part 7 we looked at the spiritual treatments for disease.

Use of Doctors:

In the Bahá’í Teachings it is made quite clear that when one is ill, one should seek the best available medical advice. This naturally leaves a person free to choose what they consider good in medical opinion.  (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 284)

According to the explicit decree of Bahá’u’lláh one must not turn aside from the advice of a competent doctor. It is imperative to consult one even if the patient himself be a well-known and eminent physician. In short, the point is that you should maintain your health by consulting a highly-skilled physician.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 155)

It is incumbent upon everyone to seek medical treatment and to follow the doctor’s instructions, for this is in compliance with the divine ordinance, but, in reality, He Who giveth healing is God.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 155)

It is possible for a man to hold to a book of medicine and say, “I have no need of a doctor; I will act according to the book; in it every disease is named, all symptoms are explained, the diagnosis of each ailment is completely written out, and a prescription for each malady is furnished; therefore, why do I need a doctor?” This is sheer ignorance. A physician is needed to prescribe. Through his skill the principles of the book are correctly and effectively applied until the patient is restored to health.  (Abdu’l-Baha, The Promulgation of Universal Peace, p. 248)

Do not neglect medical treatment when it is necessary, but leave it off when health has been restored.   (Bahá’u’lláh: Bahá’u’lláh and the New Era, 1980 ed.,p. 106)

Even doctors need to consult doctors:

According to the explicit decree of Bahá’u’lláh one must not turn aside from the advice of a competent doctor. It is imperative to consult one even if the patient himself be a well-known and eminent physician. In short, the point is that you would maintain your health by consulting a highly-skilled physician.  (‘Abdul-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 285)

Seek the best doctors you can find:

…thou hast written about thy poor sight. According to the explicit divine text the sick must refer to the doctor. This decree is decisive and everyone bound to observe it. While thou art there thou shouldst consult the most skilled and the most famed eye specialist.  (‘Abdul-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 285)

Get a second opinion:

Before having any serious operation, you should consult more than one qualified physician.  (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 291)

Use doctors and know that healing comes from God:

It is incumbent upon everyone to seek medical treatment and to follow the doctor’s instructions, for this is in compliance with the divine ordinance, but, in reality, He Who giveth healing is God.  (‘Abdul-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 284)

One must obey the command of God and submit to medical opinion. Thou hast undertaken this journey to comply with His command and not for the sake of healing, since healing is in the hand of God, not in the hand of doctors.  (‘Abdul-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 285)

Bahá’u’lláh tells us that in case of disease we should pray but at the same time refer to competent physicians, and abide by their considered decisions. Shoghi Effendi wishes you therefore to find whether your some has really become ill, and if he is, then follow the directions of the doctor. Being versed in the medical sciences they can treat better than even a loving mother can. You can render your assistance by praying for him and at the same time helping the physicians to treat him.         (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 286)

Diet and Foods:

Treat disease through diet, by preference.  (Bahá’u’lláh: Bahá’u’lláh and the New Era, 1980 ed.,p. 106)

The science of medicine is still in a condition of infancy; it has not reached maturity. But when it has reached this point, cures will be performed by things which are not repulsive to the smell and taste of man — that is to say, by aliments, fruits and vegetables which are agreeable to the taste and have an agreeable smell. (Abdu’l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 256)

The Báb hath said that the people of Baha must develop the  science of medicine to such a high degree that they will heal illnesses by means of foods.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

It is the function of a skilled physician to determine which constituent of his patient’s body hath suffered diminution, which hath been augmented. Once he hath discovered this, he must prescribe a food containing the diminished element in considerable amounts, to re-establish the body’s essential equilibrium. The patient, once his constitution is again in balance, will be rid of his disease.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

The proof of this is that while other animals have never studied medical science, nor carried on researches into diseases or medicines, treatments or cures — even so, when one of them falleth a prey to sickness, nature leadeth it, in fields or desert places, to the very plant which, once eaten, will rid the animal of its disease. The explanation is that if, as an example, the sugar component in the animal’s body hath decreased, according to a natural law the animal hankereth after a herb that is rich in sugar. Then, by a natural urge, which is the appetite, among a thousand different varieties of plants across the field, the animal will discover and consume that herb which containeth a sugar component in large amounts. Thus the essential balance of the substances composing its body is re-established, and the animal is rid of its disease.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

It is, therefore, evident that it is possible to cure by foods, ailments and fruits; but as today the science of medicine is imperfect, this fact is not yet fully grasped. When the science of medicine reaches perfection, treatment will be given by foods, ailments, fragrant fruits and vegetables, and by various waters, hot and cold in temperature  (Abdu’l-Bahá: Some Answered Questions, 1982 ed., 257-259)

Drugs:

Refrain from the use of drugs . . . Abstain from drugs when health is good, but administer them when necessary.  (Bahá’u’lláh: Bahá’u’lláh and the New Era, 1980 ed.,p. 106)

Many of us rely on prescription medications with a long list of side effects.  This can’t be good for us:

If a remedy is the cause of disease it would be better to do without the remedy.  (Compilations, Baha’i Scriptures, p. 349)

Any remedy that causes disease does not come from the great and supreme Physician.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Paris Talks, p. 130)

If the remedy bring on disease, then put it aside.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 248)

Now, is it possible that man’s sense of smell, the sense that differentiates odours, should find some odour repugnant, and that odour be beneficial to the human body? Absurd! Impossible! . . . Again, if the sense of taste, likewise a faculty that selecteth and rejecteth, be offended by something, that thing is certainly not beneficial; and if, at the outset, it may yield some advantage, in the long run its harmfulness will be established.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

The majority of the diseases which overtake man also overtake the animal, but the animal is not cured by drugs. In the mountains, as in the wilderness, the animal’s physician is the power of taste and smell. The sick animal smells the plants that grow in the wilderness; he eats those that are sweet and fragrant to his smell and taste, and is cured.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 257)

Herbs

. . . if you find what is required in a single herb, do not resort to a compounded medicament… (Bahá’u’lláh: Bahá’u’lláh and the New Era, 1980 ed.,p. 106)

Homeopathy:

One of the friends of Persia wrote to Shoghi Effendi and asked this question: “Is it true that ‘Abdu’l-Bahá has said that biochemical homeopathy, which is a form of food medicine, is in conformity with the Bahá’í medical concept?” The beloved Guardian’s reply to this question in a letter dated 25th November, 1944 was as follows: “This statement is true, and the truth thereof will be revealed in the future.”  The Universal House of Justice has also asked us to inform you that it does not wish the above statement to be circulated in isolation from the many and varied other texts in the Writings on medicine. However, you may share it with any of your friends who are interested.  (Universal House of Justice, The Compilation of Compilations vol. I, p. 485)

Chiropractic:

There is nothing in the Teachings about chiropractic as a method of healing. People are free to turn to it if they pleas and find help through it.  (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 289)

Magnets:

The other kind of healing without medicine is through the magnetic force which acts from one body on another and becomes the cause of cure. This force also has only a slight effect.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 254)

Laying on of hands:

Sometimes one can benefit a sick person by placing one’s hand upon his head or upon his heart. Why? Because of the effect of the magnetism, and of the mental impression made upon the sick person, which causes the disease to vanish. But this effect is also very slight and weak.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 254)

He who is filled with love of Bahá, and forgets all things, the Holy Spirit will be heard from his lips and the spirit of life will fill his heart. … Words will issue from his lips in strands of pearls, and all sickness and disease will be healed by the laying on of the hands.  (Dr. J.E. Esslemont, Baha’u’llah and the New Era, p. 112)

Strong Constitution:

A strong constitution often overcomes disease.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 255)

Rest:

. . . rest the body in order to do better.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Baha’i World Faith, p. 384)

Thank God I see you spiritual and at rest.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Abdu’l-Baha in London, p. 48)

You should certainly safeguard your nerves, and force yourself to take time, and not only for prayer meditation, but for real rest and relaxation. (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 297)

Suspend all other activities so you can focus on getting well:

Now your father has taken you to the best nerve specialists in…, and they all recommend that you should suspend all your activities until you are fully recovered. It is now your duty as a Bahá’í, and specially as a young believer who has still great services to render the Faith, to make every effort to recovery your health, and to be confident that by making such an effort you will be attracting the confirmations of Bahá’u’lláh, without which no true and lasting healing is possible.  (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 291)

Sleep

There are very few people who can get along without eight hours sleep. If you are not one of those, you should protect your health by sleeping enough. The Guardian himself finds that it impairs his working capacity if he does not try and get a minimum of seven or eight hours.           (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 291)

Education:

A number of development projects have also shown that people’s lives can be altered substantially by appropriate messages through the mass media, reinforce with practical activities. This is being achieved, for example, in the field of health, where communication programmes alter people’s fundamental attitudes towards diarrhoeal diseases. In some instances, people are persuaded to behave in ways opposite to their accustomed behavior (e.g., to feed children instead of withholding food during a diarrhoeal episode).  (Baha’i International Community, 1988 Mar 17, Rural Women)

As a means of service:

You should always bear in mind Bahá’u’lláh’s counsel that we should take the utmost care of our health, surely not because it is an end in itself, but as a necessary means of serving His Cause.  (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 291)

Euthanasia and Living Wills:

We have received your letter of March 18, 1974 in which you ask for the Bahá’í viewpoint on euthanasia and on the removal of life support in medical cases where physiological interventions prolong life in disabling illnesses. In general our teachings indicate that God, the Giver of life, can alone dispose of it as He deems best, and we have found nothing in the Sacred Text on these matters specifically but in a letter to an individual written on behalf of the beloved Guardian by his secretary regarding mercy killings, or legalized euthanasia, it is stated:  “…this is also a matter which the Universal House of Justice will have to legislate.”  “Until such time as the Universal House of Justice considers legislation on Euthanasia, decisions in the matters to which you refer must be left to the conscience of those responsible            (Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 290)

As to the Bahá’í viewpoint on the removal of withholding of life support in medical cases where intervention prolongs life in disabling illnesses, nothing has been found in the Sacred Text specifically on this matter. In such cases decisions must be left to those responsible, including the patients.  (Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 290)

The Universal House of Justice has found nothing in the Sacred Text about the matter of with-holding or removing life support in disabling or terminal illnesses where intervention prolongs life. Therefore, until such time as the House of justice considers legislation on these matters, it is left to the conscience of the individual concerned whether or not to subscribe to a “living will”.  (Universal House of Justice, Lights of Guidance, p. 290)

For more in this series:

Part 1: Intro to Disease

Part 2:  Reasons for Disease

Part 3:  Physical Causes of Disease

Part 4:  Spiritual Causes of Disease

Part 5:  Effects of Disease

Part 6:  Attitudes towards Disease

Part 7:  Spiritual Treatment for Disease

Part 8:  Physical Treatment for Disease

Part 9:  Why People Aren’t Getting Better

Part 10:  Advice to Doctors

Part 11:  Prayers for Health

Physical Causes of Disease

This is part three of an eleven part series on the Baha’i Perspective on Disease.   In Part 1,  we looked at how I got interested in this topic and looked at some quotes on prevention of disease.  In Part 2, we looked at the reasons for disease, and in this part we look at the physical causes of disease.

No single cause:

. . . the body of a man which was created sound and whole, but diseases have attacked him from various and divers causes and his soul is not at ease for a day, but rather his sickness increaseth, (Compilations, Baha’i Scriptures, p. 112)

Genetics:

The next challenge for WHO is to recognize that a major obstacle to enjoying the right to health is being born female.  (Baha’i International Community, 1995 Aug 26, Primary Health Care Empowerment of Women)

Genetic variations occur, producing conditions which can create problems for the individual. Some conditions are of an emotional or psychological nature, producing such imbalances as quickness to anger, recklessness, timorousness, and so forth; others involve purely physical characteristics, resulting not only in unusual capacities but also in handicaps or diseases of various kinds.  (From a letter written on behalf of the Universal House of Justice to the National Spiritual Assembly of the United States, Sept. 11, 1995; published in “The American Bahá’í”, Qawl 152 BE/Nov. 23, 1995, p 11.)

Imbalances:

The outer, physical causal factor in disease, however, is a disturbance in the balance, the proportionate equilibrium of all those elements of which the human body is composed. To illustrate: the body of man is a compound of many constituent substances, each component being present in a prescribed amount, contributing to the essential equilibrium of the whole. So long as these constituents remain in their due proportion, according to the natural balance of the whole — that is, no component suffereth a change in its natural proportionate degree and balance, no component being either augmented or decreased — there will be no physical cause for the incursion of disease.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

For example, the starch component must be present to a given amount, and the sugar to a given amount. So long as each remaineth in its natural proportion to the whole, there will be no cause for the onset of disease. When, however, these constituents vary as to their natural and due amounts — that is, when they are augmented or diminished — it is certain that this will provide for the inroads of disease.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

The basic reason for this is that if, in some component substance of the human body, an imbalance should occur, altering its correct, relative proportion to the whole, this fact will inevitably result in the onset of disease. If, for example, the starch component should be unduly augmented, or the sugar component decreased, an illness will take control. (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

When highly-skilled physicians shall fully examine this matter, thoroughly and perseveringly, it will be clearly seen that the incursion of disease is due to a disturbance in the relative amounts of the body’s component substances  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

Sickness reveals a lack of balance in human organism, an absence of equilibrium in the forces essential for the normal functioning of the human body.  (Shoghi Effendi, Lights of Guidance, p. 113)

Poor Hygiene:

The amount of illness caused by neglect of simple hygienic precautions . . . is prodigious.  (Dr. J.E. Esslemont, Baha’u’llah and the New Era, p. 103)

Germs:

. . . the germs are present in one’s own system, perhaps to lie dormant forever,  perhaps to flare up into disease.  (Ruhiyyih Khanum, The Priceless Pearl, p. 121)

Contagion:

Just as the bodily diseases like consumption and cancer are contagious, likewise the spiritual diseases are also infectious. If a consumptive should associate with a thousand safe and healthy persons, the safety and health of these thousand persons would not affect the consumptive and would not cure him of his consumptions. But when this consumptive associates with those thousand souls, in a short time the disease of consumption will infect a number of those healthy persons. This is a clear and self-evident question.  (‘Abdul-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 183)

The contagion of disease is violent and rapid . . . If two bodies are brought into contact with each other, it is certain that microbic particles will pass from one to the other. (Abdu’l-Baha, Some Answered Questions, p. 254)

Just as in bodily diseases we must prevent intermingling and infection and put into effect sanitary laws — because the infectious physical diseases uproot the foundation of humanity; likewise one must protect and safeguard the blessed souls from the breaths and fatal spiritual diseases; otherwise violation, like the plague, will become a contagion and all will perish.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Baha’i World Faith, p. 437)

Treatment of our Body:

The body should be the servant of the soul, never its master, but it should be a willing, obedient and efficient servant, and should be treated with the consideration which a good servant deserves. If it is not properly treated, disease and disaster result, with injurious consequences to master as well as servant. (Dr. J.E. Esslemont, Baha’u’llah and the New Era, p. 101)

Diet:

But man hath perversely continued to serve his lustful appetites, and he would not content himself with simple foods. Rather, he prepared for himself food that was compounded of many ingredients, of substances differing one from the other. With this, and with the perpetrating of vile and ignoble acts, his attention was engrossed, and he abandoned the temperance and moderation of a natural way of life. The result was the engendering of diseases both violent and diverse.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

For the animal, as to its body, is made up of the same constituent elements as man. Since, however, the animal contenteth itself with simple foods and striveth not to indulge its importunate urges to any great degree, and committeth no sins, its ailments relative to man’s are few. We see clearly, therefore, how powerful are sin and contumacy as pathogenic factors. And once engendered these diseases become compounded, multiply, and are transmitted to others. Such are the spiritual, inner causes of sickness.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 152)

Sensual Desires:

But if the health and welfare of man be spent in sensual desires, in a life on the animal plane, and in devilish pursuits — then disease is better than such health.      (Abdu’l-Baha, Baha’i World Faith, p. 376)

Drinking and Drugs:

The drinking of wine is, according to the text of the Most Holy Book, forbidden; for it is the cause of chronic diseases, weakeneth the nerves, and consumeth the mind.  (‘Abdul-Bahá, The Compilation of Compilations vol II, p. 246)

The amount of illness caused by . . . indulgence in alcohol and opium is prodigious.  (Dr. J.E. Esslemont, Baha’u’llah and the New Era, p. 103)

Alcohol and opium affect a man’s conscience long before they affect his gait or cause obvious bodily disease (Dr. J.E. Esslemont, Baha’u’llah and the New Era, p. 104)

Smoking:

The smoker is vulnerable to many and various diseases.  (Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of Abdu’l-Baha, p. 147)

Every qualified physician hath ruled — and this hath also been proved by tests — that one of the components of tobacco is a deadly poison, and that the smoker is vulnerable to many and various diseases.  (Adib Taherzadeh, The Revelation of Baha’u’llah v 3, p. 438)

For more in this series:

Part 1: Intro to Disease

Part 2:  Reasons for Disease

Part 3:  Physical Causes of Disease

Part 4:  Spiritual Causes of Disease

Part 5:  Effects of Disease

Part 6:  Attitudes towards Disease

Part 7:  Spiritual Treatment for Disease

Part 8:  Physical Treatment for Disease

Part 9:  Why People Aren’t Getting Better

Part 10:  Advice to Doctors

Part 11:  Prayers for Health