Select Page

Teaching Needs Detachment 

Whoso ariseth to teach Our Cause must needs detach himself from all earthly things, and regard, at all times, the triumph of Our Faith as his supreme objective. (Bahá’u’lláh, Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh, p. 334)

I have a lot of emotional pain from childhood wounds and can easily spiral into self-pity because I don’t have the things that many people take for granted – family, spouse, career, home and more.  I heard this verse sung on YouTube this morning, and it made me sit up and take notice.

I have chosen to dedicate my life to peace – that’s why I became a Bahá’í.  Implicit in that decision is the fact that I have also chosen to “arise to teach His cause”.  By breaking my heart and not letting me have the things of this world that I think I have a right to, God has “detached me from all earthly things”, so that He can use me (and all of us) to accomplish “His supreme objective”.  So if it’s my choice to be a Bahá’í, with all that this implies, what right do I have to complain when He’s giving me exactly what I need in order to accomplish His higher aims?

There’s no way on earth I would have detached myself from my kindred; or my financial security, but as I see the wisdom in it, I can forgive God for what I used to think was His punishment, and now see as His mercy.

Understanding God’s wisdom as He gives me exactly what I need, I am grateful!

What jumped out for you as you read today’s meditation?  I’d love it if you would share so we can all expand our knowledge of the Writings!

If you liked this meditation, you might also like my book Learning How to Forgive

 

Help Keep This Site Alive

 

 

Perfecting Our Life and Character

Each of us is responsible for one life only, and that is our own. Each of us is immeasurably far from being “perfect as our heavenly father is perfect” and the task of perfecting our own life and character is one that requires all our attention, our will-power and energy. (From a letter dated 12 May 1925 written on behalf of Shoghi Effendi to an individual believer, in Living the Life, pp. 5–7)

The current pandemic has activated my “compare and despair” as I look around to see what I’m doing to self-isolate and judging those individuals and businesses who are not.  This morning I realized that my lifestyle lends itself easily to isolation but for others, the situation is a lot more complex.  Not everyone is able to work from home; not everyone has the luxury of a guaranteed income; not everyone is used to doing grocery shopping once a month or every 6 weeks; not everyone is used to spending large amounts of time alone; not everyone has a spiritual core to draw on.  In so many ways, I’m luckier than many of my family and friends.  I want to focus on being grateful for what I have and compassionate and forgiving of those with less.

COVID-19 is calling on all of us to let go of the need to be perfect; to let go of expectations of ourselves and others; to see the good in others and reflect it back.  As the House of Justice says in the Naw Ruz letter, it’s our job to:

  • Rise above the horizon of firmness and steadfastness with illumined faces and radiant brows
  • Obliterate the gloom of fear and consternation
  • Let the light of assurance dawn above the horizon and shine resplendently
  • Bring hope and strength of spirit
  • Nurture the attributes of unity and fellow feeling
  • Nurture knowledge and understanding
  • Nurture a spirit of collective worship and common endeavor
  • Strengthen bonds of friendship
  • Foster tranquility, confidence and reliance on God
  • Provide elevated conversations to bring a source of comfort and inspiration to many
  • Focus our prayers on the health and well-being of all the Friends of God and for the relief of suffering

Knowing what’s expected of me during this pandemic, I am grateful!

What jumped out for you as you read today’s meditation?  I’d love it if you would share so we can all expand our knowledge of the Writings!

If you liked this meditation, you might also like my book Getting to Know Your Lower Nature

 

Help Keep This Site Alive

 

When to Postpone a Discussion

When you notice that a stage has been reached when enmity and threats are about to occur, you should immediately postpone discussion of the subject, until wranglings, disputations, and loud talk vanish, and a propitious time is at hand. (‘Abdu’l-Bahá, Lights of Guidance, p. 178)

Recently I was talking to someone who wanted to speak more kindly to her family members, upon whom she was dumping her rage and frustration.  She wondered what advice I could give her and all I thought of was to use “words as mild as milk”, which I attributed to the Bahá’í Writings, and it really seemed to have an effect on her.  I thanked God for this teaching opportunity.  I wish I’d thought of this one, though, as it’s a lot more specific.

Immediately postpone the discussion:  walk away, change the subject, don’t add any more fuel to the fire.  Wait for a propitious time to come back to it:  perhaps it will be as quickly as after taking a deep breath and saying some prayer together.  Perhaps it will be after you have something to eat, or get some much needed sleep, or after you take your problems to God and asking Him to find a solution.

Sometimes people just have no reserves when they are hungry, angry, lonely or tired or sometimes people think they have to solve the problems themselves and forget to give them to God.

Knowing I can walk away from discussions that are getting heated, I am grateful!

What jumped out for you as you read through today’s meditation?  I’d love it if you would share so we can all expand our knowledge of the Writings!

If you liked this meditation, you might also like my book Letting Go of Anger and Bitterness

 

 

 Help Keep This Site Alive

 

 

Beyond Forgiveness

We ought to show something more than forgiveness in meeting with the cruelties and strictures of our own lives. To be hurt and to forgive is saintly, but far beyond that is the power to comprehend and not be hurt. This power we may have ‑ acceptance without complaint, and it should become associated with our name ‑ we ought never be known to complain or lament. It is not that we would “make the best of things” but that we may find in everything, even in calamity itself, the germ of enduring wisdom.  (Bahiyyih Khánum, Bahá’í World, vol. 5, p.185)

While this quote is not authoritative, it comes from a source I admire and respect, as Bahiyyih Khánum exemplified every standard she asks us to reach.   For many years I couldn’t even forgive.  The best I could do is to ask God to forgive those who hurt me.  Later, I was able to forgive and let go of all the resentment and hurt I was carrying.  I made a practice of becoming conscious of every resentment and deal with it as it came up and I thought that was good, but in this quote we see that there are several additional things she wants us to consider:

  • to comprehend and not be hurt
  • to be known as someone who accepts without complaint
  • to never be known to complain or lament
  • to find in everything, even in calamity itself, the germ of enduring wisdom

The first and the last have to do with inward adjustments that have to be made.  When I remember that we all have a lower nature and are all sinners, struggling to rise above whatever life has given us, then it’s easier to remember that we are all one.  When I am spiritually strong and remember these things, I can achieve the first and fourth.  The middle two are how we behave in the world.  It seems that it might be possible to complain and lament privately, admitting it to ourselves and taking our complaints to God, asking for Him to transform them so that we can find the germ of enduring wisdom and not be hurt, so that we can face the world with the same radiant acquiescence she was known to have.

Knowing I can strive for something that goes beyond forgiveness, I am grateful!

What jumped out for you as you read today’s meditation?  I’d love it if you would share so we can all expand our knowledge of the Writings!

If you liked this meditation, you might also like my book Learning How to Forgive

 

Help Keep This Site Alive

 

 

 

Knowing Myself

O My servants! Could ye apprehend with what wonders of My munificence and bounty I have willed to entrust your souls, ye would, of a truth, rid yourselves of attachment to all created things, and would gain a true knowledge of your own selves . . .  (Bahá’u’lláh, Gleanings from the Writings of Bahá’u’lláh, pp. 326-327)

Although I’ve been aware of this quote for most of my Bahá’í life, I’ve always just focused on the last part but re-reading it this morning, I realize that this quote has 3 components:

  • apprehend the wonders of God’s munificence and bounty He has willed to entrust my soul
  • rid myself of attachment to all created things
  • gain a true knowledge of my own self

I looked up the meaning of “apprehend” and “munificence” and the definitions that made sense to me is to “take in”, God’s “generosity and kindness”.  As someone whose default position is disappointment and self-pity, I’ve come to realize that when I’m stuck in this wrong way of thinking, there is no way I can take in any goodness at all.  The tool that has helped me reverse this trend is through gratitude.  Now, every morning before I get out of bed, I think of at least 5 things I can be grateful for, and at night, before falling asleep, I think of 5 more.  I’m on a morning meeting where I also give thanks for all of God’s blessings and bounties, to help keep me in the solution of my life and not in the problem.

Secondly, I am coming to realize how much of my life is driven by fears of losing what I have and resentment at not getting what I want.  The focus is all on “me”.  When I let go, and give my day to God, and remember that He is my employer, and the only one whose approval I need to seek, my life goes better and I’m better able to take in all the gifts He’s got in store for me.

Finally, for many years, I have resisted getting to know my own self.  I kept myself so busy with work and Bahá’í service that there was no time.  Coming into recovery, I have learned that since God is closer than my life vein, taking time to know myself is also giving me the gift of my life’s purpose:  to know and worship God.

Letting go, and trusting God brings me closer to my true self and makes it easier to accept God’s love and I am grateful.

What jumped out for you as you read today’s meditation?  I’d love it if you would share so we can all expand our knowledge of the Writings!

If you liked this meditation, you might also like my book Strengthening Your Relationship with God

Help Keep This Site Alive